amazing horsemanship


A repost of an older post. I recently saw this video clip again and am impressed now as I was then.

The history of the horse and the fighting man are so intertwined that even modern military units are still designated as Mechanized or Air  “Cavalry”. The Samurai, The Knight, and Horse borne soldiers up to the recent era all took advantage of the size, power, endurance and speed of the horse to overcome their enemies.

While not an example of a “Warhorse” per se, the video above shows the impressive athletic ability of the animal and the almost magical connection between the horse and rider. Watch the amazing side-stepping and footwork. The horse is a Lusitano stallion named Merlin.

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10 thoughts on “amazing horsemanship”

  1. That was too cool. Brutal stuff with the bull fighting. Deck is stacked against the bull, but that horse was incredible.

  2. Amazing animal. Moved like a rodeo bullfighter. I used to rodeo, so I’ve seen some horses move like that, but never under such duress. Both that rider and horse possess some serious skills.

  3. After doing a bit of research I have discovered that Merlin(Orpheo) is a Bullfighting Lusitano stallion 7/8’s Lusitano X 1/8th Quarterhorse.

    Wikipedia states:

    The Lusitano is an ancient Portuguese horse breed, that until the 1960s shared its registration with the Spanish Andalusian horse. Both are sometimes called Iberian horses, as they originated from the Iberian peninsula. They were developed for military purposes, and later used for dressage and bull fighting. In America, Lusitanos and Andalusians are registered together under the International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Association.

    So I wasnt really far off with the breed.

      1. “Merlin” (formerly Orpheo) is from the breeder and former “rejoneador” Jacques Bonnier (the tall gray haired gentleman who greets de Mendoza before he returns to the bull). Merlin was initially trained by Rafi Dumond (seen in the opening). He is currently owned and ridden in the bullring by Pablo Hermoso de Mendoza.

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