my favorite pocket knife

 

dscn08064

Over the years I have tried different knives for duty carry. As my concern du jure changed over the years; self-defense, victim extraction tool, package opener, casing extractor, etc. so did my knife. The one I keep going back to is my good old Spyderco Clipit Endura. It’s large and sturdy enough to be a formidable weapon if pressed to it but small and light enough to ride comfortably clipped to the pocket. Some of the other so called “pocket folders” I purchased may have well as been a Bowie for their overall size and weight. At first I wasn’t a big fan of an entirely serrated blade but it has grown on me. I have sawed through seatbelts with it, opened packages, extracted stuck casings, cut open boxes while executing search warrants, turned screws, opened door locks and windows and just about any other task I’ve put to it. Another advantage to the Spyderco is the price. My propensity to loose or break things combined with a job where fence jumping and foot chases are a real possibility makes the “will I want to pull my hair out if I loose it factor” an important point. Loosing a $60-$90 dollar knife in a dark backyard is less painful than a $200-$400 one. The same goes for pens, watches and sunglasses. Unless it winds up in a gutter somewhere, I will probably carry this knife for the foreseeable future.

training magazines

 

trainingmag

A little item that I cant recommend enough for dry-fire firearms training is a good training magazine. There are some excellent manufacturers out there making replica magazines out of high quality plastics that replicate the weight and feel of the real thing. Besides their obvious uses, using training magazines also provides the shooter with a safety indicator that live ammunition is not in the training area or in the weapon. The ones I use are made by Dillon Precision. BlueGuns also makes a quality product. For the cost of about $15, you get the benefit of manipulating magazines, performing reloads and clearing malfunctions added to your dry-fire training with the weight and feel of the real thing; plus the added safety of knowing that a live magazine hasn’t accidentally found its way into your firearm. A+

anatomy of a “police beating”

Take a look at this video. Perhaps some of you remember this from 2003. The Cincinnati police were dispatched to a Whitecastle restaurant where a man, latter identified as Nathaniel Jones, was reported to the police as acting strangely. As The Cincinnati Enqirer reported…

Police officials, radio transmissions and the video give a picture of how the circumstances unfolded at the White Castle at 64 W. Mitchell Ave., just west of Vine Street.

About 5:50 a.m. a White Castle employee called 911 to report that a man had passed out in the grass outside the restaurant.

“He’s breathing, but he keeps hollering 19,” she told the call taker.

When emergency medical personnel arrived, Jones was awake and “becoming a nuisance” at the restaurant, according to a tape of radio transmissions in which firefighters ask police to respond.

In the video, Jones walks toward an officer, who yells, “Stay back.”

Jones then lunged, swinging at the officer’s head before he stumbled into the officer, taking him down.

The two officers, Osterman and Pike, jabbed Jones in the torso with nightsticks as they repeatedly yelled, “Put your hands behind your back.”

But Jones continued to fight, flailing his arms and grabbing one of the police batons. The officers called for backup, asking especially for someone with a stun gun. Eventually, six officers responded, many of them also using their batons to strike Jones. After a struggle with all six, they got Jones on his stomach and his arms behind his back.

The officers turned Jones over after he was handcuffed over and realized he needed medical help, Janke said.

“He looked to be in enough distress that the officers immediately called for a fire company,” Janke said.

Jones had a pulse when EMS arrived, but he died within minutes of arriving at University Hospital, Janke said.

Why Jones behaved as he did is not yet known, Janke said.

During the struggle, officers tried to call for an officer trained to deal with people with mental health problems, but the officer was on another call.

Police did not use a stun gun, but did use chemical spray in addition to the batons. Janke did not know how many of the officers hit Jones.

Police estimate that Jones, who was 5 foot 6 inches tall, weighed 400 pounds. They did not release a current address for Jones.

According to court records, Jones pleaded guilty in 1998 to possessing cocaine and was given three years probation, which included inpatient treatment at Talbert House. A month after his sentencing, Jones violated his probation and was sentenced to a year in jail, records show.

Now, as a police officer I can state that I see absolutely nothing wrong with how officers handled this situation. What do people think happens out there when a 400lb man starts swinging at a cops head and resists arrest? What would all these people screaming “police brutality” have done if they were the ones behind the badge? We carry those batons and sprays for a reason, other than the fact that they make us look so cool. The man was struck in exactly the targets we are all trained to strike. The arms, legs, and sides of the torso. He was not struck in the head, the joints or spine. The official autopsy found external bruises from officers’ night sticks — all below Jones’ waist — but no evidence that the clubbing by police caused any damage to internal organs. The man was actively fighting and refusing to obey commands to “put your hands behind your back!!”, refusing to be cuffed and resisting arrest. Thats exactly what those batons are carried for,what do people expect of the police?

IMO this is a classic example of people wanting the police to “do their jobs” and keep the streets safe, but not having a clue of what the job requires. They dont really want to see what “the job” is like. They either want to harbor those little fantasies of “verbal judo” and Kung-Fu wrist locks or picture all of us eating doughnuts and pulling kittens out of trees. Then theres the people with the political axe to grind. I will not get into racial issues here, but I can guarantee you that ANYBODY of any race would have been treated exactly the same under those conditions. If it werent for his extreme obesity and drug abused heart, this man would have been taken into custody none the worse for wear.

I just dont get it.

The coroner stated…..

“His death must be regarded as a direct and immediate consequence of the struggle (with police), potentiated by his obesity, his heart disease and his drug intoxication,” Parrott said. “When issued by this office, Mr. Jones’ death certificate will list, as the immediate cause of death, cardiac dysrhythmia, due to physiological stress reaction, due to a violent struggle with restraint.”

As a result of this incident, the president of the Ohio State Coroners Association, told reporters that he intended to lobby for a new manner-of-death category that would offer coroners an option of “legal intervention,” which could be used when a person dies in police custody. Under existing Ohio law, deaths can be attributed to natural causes, accident, suicide or homicide.

short rant

thinblue

Departing a bit from the usual stuff I post here, but bear with me.

Something that I have issues with in the online community and in the real world is the anti-cop/anti-soldier crowd. Some people are just outright contemptuous and name calling…jackboot, babykiller, pig, etc. etc. Then there are the “I respect soldiers/cops, I really do, my brother is a cop, BUT…..” people who corner you with stories of beatings, abuse of authority, how some cop was “rude” to them on a traffic stop, how being a soldier or a cop is no more dangerous than being a cab driver or 7-11 clerk, why a cop can get out of a speeding ticket but they cant and on..and on….

Something I have always noticed is how predominantly “male” all these types are. Yes you do find the odd woman amongst the crowd, but by and large it seems to be guys with the biggest beef. Now some percentage of this group is just going to hate authority because they are always doing something illegal to draw their attention, but  IMO 99% of this phenomena is EGO. I wasnt always a cop and I remember the feeling you can get when another man with authority you dont have walks into the room. We all want to be the “big man” in the room no matter what a guy says. Next time you are with a group of guys and the topic of the military or LEO’s comes up, pay attention to who starts talking about how “they were going to join but…(insert some political bullshit here)” or how they will segue into some macho topic they have experience in (martial arts, weight lifting, bar fights, car racing, motorcycles, sports etc.).

Yes, some guys do overappreciate themselves once they get in uniform…mostly the young “newjacks” who still go around pissing on trees to assert their authority, I wont deny that. But in the grand scheme of things, at least in my experience, most of us are just normal guys doing our best to live up to our responsibilities. Any human endeavor is going to be subject to human frailties, and yes there will always be “bad cops” or “bad soldiers”, but by and large you will find some of the best people you will ever meet in those fields. Believe me, I don’t think I am a better person than “you”. I don’t know you. Perhaps you could kick the crap out of me, out shoot me, out run me. Whatever. I am just trying to do the best job I can.

And as to the “rude cops”…believe me…take the person who is telling the story into account. Many times its the attitude of the person getting stopped thats the issue…”why are you stopping me!!??”…”You only stopped me because Im…..(insert various things here)!!”…”Im calling my attorney!”….”Whats your badge number??”…..all this over a freakin seat-belt ticket. I have heard complaints that range from legitimate to outright foolish. One was to complain that the officer was shining a flashlight into her car. [sarcasm] The unmitigated gall of that officer. Can you believe that?!? [/sarcasm]